Parole with Consecutive Felony Sentences

There is a unique parole review process for individuals with consecutive felony sentences. Understanding the distinctions will help you support your loved one on their journey towards freedom. At The Cox Law Firm, we have experience navigating the parole process and representing individuals with consecutive sentences. We will fight for your loved one regardless of the charges they face.

The Initial Offense

With consecutive sentences, the Board of Pardons and Paroles considers sentences separately. Thus, the Board will hear your loved one’s initial offense first.

The Board members estimate your loved one’s parole eligibility had they only had one offense. Then, similar to standard hearing procedures, the Board will consider your loved one’s static and dynamic factors. Finally, the panelists vote to either approve or deny your loved one’s parole.

If parole is approved

If the Board grants your loved one parole, they are not released. Instead, the clock restarts and your loved one will begin serving their next sentence. Additionally, the Board determines when your loved one is next eligible for parole by the type of charge and length of sentence for the subsequent offense.

If parole is denied

If the Board denies your loved one parole, their decision will fall into one of the following categories as quoted from Section 145.13 of the Texas Administrative Code. 

  1. Deny favorable parole action and set the next review date at one year from the panel decision date. If the offender is serving an offense under Section 508.149(a), Government Code, or second or third degree under Section 22.04, Penal Code; the next review date (month/year) may be set at any date in the five-year incarceration period following the panel decision date, but in no event shall it be less than one calendar year from the panel decision date; or
  2. If the offender is serving an offense under Section 508.149(a), Government Code, or second or third degree under Section 22.04, Penal Code; deny release and order serve-all, but in no event shall this be utilized if the offender’s maximum expiration date is over five years from the date of the panel decision.

    If the offender is not serving an offense under Section 508.149(a), Government Code, deny release and order serve-all, but in no event shall this be utilized if the offender’s maximum expiration date is over one year from the date of the panel decision.

With more than two sentences, the Board will review each sentence chronologically prior to the final sentence, according to the above policies.

The Subsequent Offense

For the subsequent offense, your loved one will be subject to the normal review process for their final sentence. At this point, the Board can release your loved one from prison upon approval. Learn more about the standard parole voting process here

Additionally, below are the 2019 Texas parole statistics for individuals serving consecutive sentences. Last year, there were 1,091 consecutive cases that the review Board heard. The Board approved parole for 241, or 22.09%, of these cases.

Parole considerations for offenders serving consecutive sentences

Support Through the Parole Process

It can feel daunting when your loved one faces multiple sentences. However, there is promise for an early release. Your loved one can shave years off of their sentence, and we are here to help.

Support throughout the parole process is always advantageous. However, professional support can have added payoffs when dealing with the intricacies of multiple charges. Please contact us if you have any questions about consecutive felony sentencing or want our parole representation.

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